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. from 1980 until this year when a lame duck session followed a presidential election, every single judicial nominee reported with bipartisan judicial committee support has been confirmed. that's whether it was a republican or democratic president or republican-controlled or democratic-controlled senate. according to the nonpartisan congressional research service, no consensus nominee reported prior to the august recess has ever been denied a vote before now. somehow this president is treated differently than all the other presidents before it. it had been here with president ford, president carter, president reagan, first president bush, president clinton, second president bush, now president obama. none of those other presidents were treated in the way this president is treated. it's something senate democrats have never done in a lame duck session, whether after a presidential or midterm election. in fact, the senate democrats allowed votes on 20 of president george w. bush's judicial nominees, including three circuit court nominees in the lame duck session after the election in
just lost re-election and the eight or so seats. on the other hand, he still has a very diverse caucus in terms of ideology and it's going to be very difficult. you'll notice in hiss comments he didn't say no to 37%. that said, if he agreed to 37% and he's basically bilateral talks with the president, who says the kwaux is going to approve that. he could end up with a lot of egg on his face if he agrees with the president on this, they go forward with the vote, and it doesn't pass. >> david, the office of management and budget, omb, asking government agencies to figure out what they would cut if we do go over this fiscal cliff. talking a trillion dollars in cuts over ten years. that would mean furloughs for some federal workers, slower hiring, outside contracting, the closer we get to the cliff, the more real it begins to seem. how does that then change the negotiations? >> well, i think it's all part of the political pressure the white house is trying to apply to the congressional republicans. we saw the same thing in '11 when we had the near government shutdown and the dispute over t
. chavez was elected to a third term in october. the 58-year-old already had two operations, chemotherapy and radiation treatment. >>> this morning former president george h.w. bush is waking up at a texas hospital, a hospital spokesperson says the 88-year-old continues improving but he's not going to be released this weekend. another update is expected tomorrow. the nation's 41st president has been in the hospital for more than two weeks now. he's undergoing treatment for bronchitis-related cough but no word yet on when the former president will be released from the hospital. >>> this morning police are looking for two people who attacked a cab driver in the district. the attack happened early yesterday morning in the 900 block euclid street. they say someone knocked him unconscious and when he woke up all the items were gone. >>> it is another tragedy for the nfl. dallas cowboy defense tackle josh brent will be in court later this morning, facing charges of intoxication, manslaughter after crashing his car while driving drunk, killing one of his teammates. this comes one week african ca
possible. we had a great partnership this year, including conventions, election night, and so we're very, very excited to be ail to bring these substantive conversations about the most important issues driving washington to you, thanks to the bank of america. thank you, john, and thank you to your colleagues. you may have gotten cards. we'll be bringing you into the conversation, think about what you're going to ask. without further adieu, we'll bring in bob woodward. mr. woodward? [applause] >> thank you. saving seats with my notes. i'll pick those up. >> which is your chair? >> you get the daddy chair. >> okay, thank you, thank you. >> so the price of politics, which has become a best seller, as all your books do, looked at the last cliff negotiations over the previous grand bargain that didn't quite get over the finish line. what does that teach us about the current cliff negotiations? >> well, it's ground hog day. the question who is playing bill murray? i mean such a repetition. it's the same players at the same seats at the table with the same doctrines, and, so, you know, where th
wield in the next election rather than to join together in a bipartisan basis and solve what's broken in our immigration system. let's start here, let's build on this. we can do it today if we can just somehow avoid the objections and to pass this legislation that's been passed by the house. it passes the stem visa bill, it keeps families together, it represents values that i would think both sides of the aisle would applaud. with that, mr. president, i would yield the floor and suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: mrs. murray: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from washington. mrs. murray: i ask unanimous consent the quorum call be lifted. the presiding officer: without objection. mrs. murray: thank you, mr. president. mr. president, middle-class families in our country today are paying very close attention to what we are doing here in washington, d.c. they really understand what is at stake. they know that the impact our decisions will have on their lives, and they keep hoping that their elect
. >> in a few days after the election when republicans vote didn't have the president has been disbanded voters like a 44-point gap. right away they said we need to do something aggressive on immigration. but it wasn't a couple weeks. republicans already couldn't agree on what needs to be done. how do you get your own party on the same page, devout democrats? >> i disagree. i don't think that's it's happening. what happens is the concept of immigration reform is one of consensus on the details of immigration reform with every major piece of legislation. we have millions of people who come here illegally. a lot of them come to me and say we've done it the right way and we didn't pay the fees, the churchgoing may somehow affecting the legally legally it would have been faster? it didn't seem right, so people are troubled by it. that's one example of one debate we will have. there's going to be invited to bid in the democratic party. as labor unions i'm in favor of a guestworker program. they will have an internal party debates. there's no magic solution. it's important to do and i believe we can.
elections over those seeking to bring adam gross back home to maryland is hoping the time is right for cuba and the obama administration to resolve a diplomatic stalemate. >> in cuba modernization is relative. when alan gross was em employed to bring satellite phones to connect a small jewish community with the internet. he's been in prison ever since charged with crimes against the state. on the cbs morning show his wife says they do talk once a week by phone. >> giving him hope that yes we're working as hard as we can and telling him what senators or whoever has been involved. >> he should be released. he should be released because he never should have been detained. >> but the castro government says five of its spies in the u.s. must be released first. >> the united states government refuses with the cuban government to achieve a solution. >> when senator cardinal was asked about that on cbs. >> they're totally different cases. what cuba has to do is release alan gross. >> that doesn't mean they can't sit down and try and talk again and aga
pleadly if the court denied review. activists say they feel some momentum from the november elections. >> three states legalized same sex marriage just a month ago. the tide is shifting. >> i want it to be tackled. i want to get married and i want to be married in any state. >> many people say they are happy the court will address the issue but they say they understand that the possibility the ruling may go against the very thing they are fighting for. >> opponents of same sex marriage believe the justices will see things there way. >> we are confident that the court is going to up hold the right of the people to amend their own constitution. >> the man who wrote proposition eight said the court shouldn't go against the measure that 7 million california voters approved. >>> we have much more on the court case coming up at 7:30. how the decision on same sex marriage ban could come down to one vote and the division among states on this issue and you will always find more informationon our website. >> in concord a state boarder has died after being hit by a vehicle. it happened ye
in america's highest elected office after they leave office. in 1958 congress first authorized secret service protection for former presidents, which was limited to a reasonable period of time after a president leaves office. congress expanded this to lifetime protection in 1965. but in 1994, congress once again limited secret service protection for former presidents. this time to 10 years after a president leaves office. this 10-year restriction applied to presidents who took office after january 1, 1997. the role of the former president has changed throughout the years. former presidents now have a global presence and are often seen as de facto representatives of the united states. whether it's former president carter's work in peace negotiations with other countries or president clinton's global initiative, former presidents have a valuable role in using their experience and knowledge to help the u.s. in both a public and private capacity. the world has changed dramatically since the 9/11 terrorist attacks. the threats to american personnel and interests continue as terrorists raged a war
people go see the movie and judge for themselves. but it's an election year and people say things in that process. and now that we have a movie that is actually going to be in theaters soon, i think people will see we didn't come with any agenda at all. >> i think one of the things they're going to be surprised at one of the center characters, perhaps the person most responsible for finding where he was hiding was a woman, the character you play, mya. what did you think of her? >> well, when i first read the script, i was shocked that a woman played a central role in it and then i was upset at myself that i was so shocked. why wouldn't a woman play a central role to it? it helps when your script writers and investigative journalists. three months before we start shooting to basically go to school. >> did you get to meet her? >> no, she's an undercover cia agent. >> was there pressure bringing her to the screen knowing she may be watching your portrayal of her. >> or sitting next to me on a bus. >> she could be running the camera in here. we don't know. >> yes, there's a lot of pre
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10